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Graduate program in logic

  • The logic seminar for Fall 2019 was held Wednesdays at 2:30–3:20pm in Keller 314.
  • The logic seminar for Spring 2020 will be held Fridays at 2:30–3:20pm in Keller 314.
  • There was no logic seminar in Fall 2020 due to the pandemic. However, see the international online seminar Computability Theory and Applications.

If you are interested in the seminar, please let Kameryn Williams know to be added to the mailing list.

The Department of Mathematics at University of Hawaii at Manoa has long had an informal graduate program in logic, lattice theory, and universal algebra (People, Courses, Description) going back to Alfred Tarski’s 1963 student William Hanf.

We are offering the following course rotation (courses mostly repeating after two years):

 

Past offerings
Semester Course number Course title Instructor
Spring 2016 MATH 649 Applied Model Theory Ross
Fall 2016 MATH 654 Graduate Introduction to Logic Beros
Spring 2017 MATH 657 Computability and Complexity Khan
Spring 2018 MATH 649 Applied Model Theory Ross
Fall 2018 MATH 654 Graduate Introduction to Logic Kjos-Hanssen
Spring 2019 MATH 655 Set theory Williams
Spring 2020 MATH 657 Computability and Complexity Kjos-Hanssen

 

Future offerings:

Semester Course number Course title Instructor
Fall 2020 MATH 654 Graduate Introduction to Logic Kjos-Hanssen
Spring 2021 MATH 649 Applied model theory Ross
Spring 2022 MATH 657 Computability and Complexity Kjos-Hanssen

It is also recommended that students familiarize themselves with undergraduate level logic, which is offered on the following schedule:

 

Past offerings
Semester Course number Course title Instructor
Fall 2012 MATH 454 Axiomatic Set Theory Kjos-Hanssen
Spring 2013 MATH 455 Mathematical Logic Kjos-Hanssen
Fall 2014 MATH 454 Axiomatic Set Theory Ross
Spring 2015 MATH 455 Mathematical Logic Khan
Spring 2016 MATH 454 Axiomatic Set Theory Khan
Spring 2017 MATH 455 Mathematical Logic Ross
Spring 2018 MATH 455 Mathematical Logic Khan
Fall 2019 MATH 454 Axiomatic Set Theory Williams
Spring 2020 MATH 455 Mathematical Logic Williams

 

Future offerings:

Semester Course number Course title Instructor
Fall 2021 MATH 454 Axiomatic Set Theory TBA
Spring 2022 MATH 455 Mathematical Logic TBA

Faculty teaching in the program

David A. Ross, Professor
Bjørn Kjos-Hanssen, Professor
Kameryn Williams, Temporary Assistant Professor 2018–2021

AncientRome-4

Private tutoring

Interested in private tutoring?

Here is a list of graduate students who are willing to tutor
privately for the Fall 2020 term. Please use the
“@math.hawaii.edu” email address for all.

Aaron Hagstrom: hagstr
Sam Birns: sbirns
Hugh Chou: hchou
Saroj Niraula: sniraula
Ikenna Nometa: ikenna
Rico Vicente: rvicente

Please contact them directly to make arrangements such as cost,
meeting time and place, etc.  The Mathematics Department is not
responsible for these arrangements.

Departmental Teaching Award for Annie Carter

Citation on Annie Carter’s teaching

Annie Carter has a very serious attitude towards the educational mission of our Department.

Within just two years of time, she has taught a wide variety of courses spanning from MATH 112 to a graduate class.

Annie has demonstrated the will, the ability, and the enthusiasm to do the courses which are notoriously difficult to teach.

In her classes, Dr. Carter introduced innovative teaching techniques such as active learning and flipped classroom.

While very demanding towards the instructor, these techniques engage students into investing more efforts into the class material and entail better learning outcomes.

Certain classes are known to have unique challenges. For example, MATH 321 is very important: that is the class in our curriculum where the students encounter mathematical ways of argumentation, the proofs. For many students, that is a shift of their paradigm towards Mathematics. Annie built the class in a way such that the students were made to discover the new paradigm on their own. Engaging the students into that requires a lot of effort, and offers really unique experience to the students.That requires from the students to invest more efforts into the class, and is not necessarily immediately appreciated by the students. However, in the long run, the concepts discovered by students as a result of their own efforts are more valuable than those learnt as ready to use recipes.

Annie used a similar approach in MATH 112 which is a challenging class to teach even in a traditional way.
On the top of other innovative instructional techniques, Dr. Carter introduced ”projects” in MATH 420.
Better learning outcomes do not come with innovative teaching technologies for free. They demand more work from students, therefore more support from the instructor. Many An- nie’s students across the variety of classes, traditionally and non-traditionally taught, highly appreciate instructor’s support and availability outside the class. Speaking about students’ response, Annie earned high appreciation in classes as different and requiring as different approaches as MATH 420 and MATH 242-243.
Dr Carter’s involvement in our educational efforts is not bound by her teaching. She is interested in educational initiatives in general and often volunteers to be part of such initiatives. In the 2019-20 academic year she was (jointly with Prof. Post) a coordinator of our LA program for MATH 241; there were many difficult and demanding issues to handle that year, and Annie rose to the challenge. Her contributions to the work of the curriculum committee have also been very valuable.

To summarize, Dr. Carter invests a lot into teaching and education. Her hard work, desire to adopt innovative approaches, her willingness to devote her time and efforts won her this year’s teaching award.