Calendar

Aug
18
Thu
Colloquium: Ashwin Iyengar (Johns Hopkins)
Aug 18 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Aug
22
Mon
Fall 2022 instruction begins
Aug 22 all-day
Aug
25
Thu
Colloquium: Nicolette Meshkat (Santa Clara University)
Aug 25 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Aug
26
Fri
Colloquium- Pavel Exner (Czech Technical University)
Aug 26 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Speaker: Pavel Exner (Czech Technical University)

Title: Quantum mechanics on metric graphs:what we can learn from it?

Sep
16
Fri
Colloquium: Xu
Sep 16 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Please join us for a colloquium presentation this Friday (09/16) at 3:30pm in Keller 302.

The speaker will be our new colleague Chuang Xu. Please find the title and abstract below.

—-

Title: Mean field limit of heterogeneous networks of higher order
interactions

Abstract: Networks are widely used in modelling science phenomena
(chemical reaction networks, brain networks, epidemic networks,
ecological networks, etc.). Almost all networks in nature are
heterogeneous. Such heterogeneity together with the huge size of the
network makes it challenging to study the dynamics of these networks
analytically or numerically. It is well known that network of higher
order interactions (H.O.I.) can invoke new dynamics. In this talk, I
will briefly introduce a recent work on the mean field limit of
heterogeneous networks of H.O.I.. Hypergraphs are generally used to
capture the underlying graphical structure of these networks. I will
first review the literature and the concepts of hypergraphs and graph
limits, and explain the main difficulty. Then I will introduce our work
on the mean field limit of heterogeneous networks, by introducing limits
of hypergraphs. Finally, I will mention some applications in physics,
epidemiology and ecology. This is a joint work with Christian Kuehn.
—-

Sep
23
Fri
Colloquium: Lodha
Sep 23 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm



Join us for a colloquium presentation this Friday (09/23) at 3:30pm in Keller 302.

The speaker will be our colleague Yash Lodha.

—-Title: Adventures in the land of Homeo+(R).

Abstract: The groups of homeomorphisms of the real line and the circle exhibit a remarkable subgroup structure, and consequently, a plethora of topological, algebraic and combinatorial phenomena. In this talk I shall provide some historical motivation to study such groups, and describe some concrete examples that illustrate the theory. If time permits, I will present some recent advances in the area.

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Oct
3
Mon
Colloquium: Ken Ono
Oct 3 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Dec
8
Thu
Last Day of Instruction
Dec 8 all-day